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What are wedding dress trains?

Which bridal gown trains will suit your body shape?

Wedding trains Choosing the right train for your wedding dress needs careful thought, because it can transform your wedding dress, but should be as well consistent with the type of wedding you are having. You also need to think about how you are going to deal with the wedding train after the actual wedding ceremony. Your body type and height should be a factor in the right choice of your wedding gown.

 

The wedding dress train is the extended wedding dress skirt behind the dress that trails behind the bride. The tradition of a wedding dress train can be dated back to the middle Ages, where the length of a train worn at court indicated a woman’s social rank, because only a woman of a high and wealthy status could afford the extra fabric. That means the wealthier the woman the longer was her dress train. Today the train length indicates more how formal the wedding is. Typically, wedding dresses with long trains are categorized as being formal wedding dresses, whereas wedding dresses with short trains, or no train at all, are categorized as informal wedding dresses. As mentioned the wedding train length has to match occasion. You would not want to have a cathedral length train if you are having a summer wedding at the beach.

It is the job of your bridesmaid to arrange the train when you have walked down the aisle but then the bride is on her own to deal with the train. The longer and heavier it is the more difficult to cope with after the wedding ceremony. The most common solutions are a detachable train, which is usually fastened to the skirt near the waist and can be removed altogether, or you can attach a series of loops to the inside of the skirt so that the train can be hooked up into a bustle shape, or a loop can be made that goes over the bride's wrist or thumb, so that she can hold the train out of the way at the wedding reception.

Wedding dress trains come in varying lengths and styles. Here is an overview of the most common ones:

Overview of wedding dress train types

Cathedral

Chapel

Court

Monarch

Panel

Sweep

Watteau

 

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Table of wedding dress train length that go best with each body shape

**These suggestions are generalized- there always exceptions to the rule

  Neat Hourglass Full Hourglass Pear Apple Inverted Triangle Lean Column Rectangle
Cathedral              
Chapel              
Court              
Monarch              
Panel              
Sweep              
Watteau              

 

Table of wedding dress train length that go best with your height

•• these suggestions are generalized- there always exceptions to the rule

  Short Average Tall
Cathedral      
Chapel      
Court      
Monarch      
Panel      
Sweep      
Watteau      

 

Wedding train definition

Cathedral train extends about 7 feet from behind the waist and is a very formal and traditional option, which requires assistance.

Chapel train goes about 3-4 feet from the waist and is the one of the most popular choices for a wedding dress, because it makes a statement without looking too grand.

Court train is often of the similar length as the SWEEP train- or Brush train. The difference is here that it extends right from the waist.

Monarch train is the grandest option of them all. It extends about 6-12 feet from the waist and requires a lot of assistance, so that the bride is not weighting down by the heaviness of the fabric.

Panel train is a separate panel attached to the back of the waist. It is about a foot wide and functions as a train. The length varies from and often can be detached after the wedding ceremony.

Sweep train goes by the name brush veil as well and is the shortest veil of all of them- it barely sweeps the floor and extends usually 1 ½ feet or less from where the wedding dress touches the floor.

Watteau train is a single panel that is either attached at the top of the shoulders of the wedding dress or on the upper back of the wedding bodice. Either way it falls loosely to the hemline.


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